Adonde Press

Newly formed, Adonde Press, is an experiment in communications for social change.  Three initial publications are planned to measure the interest and viability of the concept. As envisioned, the press intends to keep publications between 80 and 120 pages.  Fewer pages it is thought will make publications less intimidating and time consuming for a broader range of readers and those less likely to read.

Should the idea garner sufficient interest and participation, Adonde also envisions creating an online journal: Moving Toward Socialism (MTS). MTS would be devoted to analytical writing and creative work envisioning how a socialist USA might look, feel and function, as well as strategies and tactics for building a movement to make it happen.

A journal like MTS would endeavor to show detailed scenarios of what white and blue-collar workers could accomplish if they set economic goals and controlled the value they create, not capitalists.

Categories of inquiry could include analysis, proposals, applications pertaining to the following subjects and many more.

  • Governance models of public, cooperative and worker-owned industries
  • Economic management and planning
  • Firm-to-firm relations, market roles and planning models.
  • Art for movement building and cultural renaissance
  • Music, theater, visual arts, film and literature.
  • Prison abolition and reforming the legal system
  • Work – leisure balance. Job sharing. Compensation and reward.
  • Reinventing urban and suburban living space
  • Rural development and agriculture
  • Advancing sustainable, ecological farming and animal production.

At this time, Adonde Press is a personal initiative intended to contribute to the discussion signified by the press name, Adonde, which means ‘to where’ in Spanish.  At this juncture in the trajectory of capitalist crises and imperialist wars and intrigue, it may be the most important question to ask. Yet, since the downfall of socialism in numerous nations, this question has been avoided, particularly in the United States.

Choosing a trajectory toward socialism must be rigorously debated.  An old union friend and ingenious negotiator often quipped to members at contract time: “We gotta know where we’re going, if we want to get there.”  If capitalism is not the only alternative, then embracing such a task is an essential part of the struggle.